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Letter reveals intelligence ties between Blair's Britain and Gaddafi's Libya

Lawyers have uncovered a letter in which former UK Prime Minister Tony Blair thanks Muammar Gaddafi for the “excellent co-operation” between the spy agencies of the UK and Libya. The letter, written in 2007, shows Blair addressing the strongman Libyan leader simply as “Dear Muammar,” before informing Gaddafi that the government’s attempt to deport two alleged members of the Libyan Islamic Fighting Group (LIFG) back to Libya was about to fail.
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Argentina Intelligence Power Struggle May Have Lead To Death of Argentine Prosecutor

The head of Argentine intelligence was replaced in December, resulting in the firing of agents who had been helping with Nisman's investigation. Nisman had accused agents from another faction within the state intelligence apparatus of being part of Fernandez's alleged plot to clear the Iranian suspects. One of those fired in the December shakeup was Antonio Stiusso, a senior spy who had helped Nisman with the probe.
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A Win for Federal Whistleblowers as Supreme Court Sides with Fired Air Marshal

Robert MacLean was fired after he exposed what he considered to be a reckless decision by the TSA three years earlier. In 2003, the agency issued an alert of a possible hijacking plot on a commercial flight. Air marshals were on alert, but TSA officials canceled overnight missions for MacLean and others in an effort to save money on hotel lodging. MacLean thought the decision was shortsighted, and revealed the decision to the TSA inspector general. When that didn’t change things, he leaked the matter to MSNBC. The media exposure forced the TSA to reverse its decision.
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This Battery Has Lasted 175 Years and No One Knows How

There sits, in the Clarendon Laboratory at Oxford University, a bell that has been ringing, nonstop, for at least 175 years. It's powered by a single battery that was installed in 1840. Researchers would love to know what the battery is made of, but they are afraid that opening the bell would ruin an experiment to see how long it will last.
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State Department Official Wants 'Frozen' Eco Propaganda to Teach Kids About Climate Change

A high-ranking State Department official wants to enlist Princess Elsa and a talking snowman to teach the American public about the Arctic.
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New Utah Law Instructs Cops To Seize Uninsured Vehicles

Does the government really even need excuses to seize the assets of its citizens, especially for relatively minor crimes? Apparently it does, at least according to the state of Utah.
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Goldman Sachs President Hints UK Exit From EU Will See Banks Flee London

President of Goldman Sachs Gary Cohn stated that London was a great financial capital and urged the United Kingdom to stay in the European Union.
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Mapping The World's Greatest Risks (According To Davos)

"War" is back on the minds of the world's richest men (and women). The Global Risks Landscape, a map of the most likely and impactful global risks, puts forward that, 25 years after the fall of the Berlin Wall, “interstate conflict” is once again a foremost concern. As The World Economic Forum notes, these multiple cross-cutting challenges can threaten social stability, perceived to be the issue most interconnected with other risks in 2015, and additionally aggravated by the legacy of the global economic crisis in the form of strained public finances and persistent unemployment.
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"I'm So Ashamed" - Meet The Drone Operator Who Helped Kill 1,626 People And Walked Away

The face of America's unauthorized offshore wars has changed over the years, and these days it can most often be found watching the infrared screen of a terminal in some heavily-guarded air force base on US soil, operating heavily-armed, remote-controlled drones thousands of miles away, tasked with executing a lethal mission which usually involves one or more "collateral" casualties.
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Bakery Under Government Investigation For Refusing To Write Anti-Gay Message On A Cake

Marjorie Silva, a bakery owner in Colorado, is currently under investigation for religious discrimination after she refused to write an anti-gay message on a cake for one of her customers. The incident happened back in March when a customer named Bill Jack ordered several cakes that he wanted to feature an anti-gay message on.
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Head of US state media put RT on same challenge list as ISIS, Boko Haram

Newly-appointed chief of US Broadcasting Board of Governors (BBG), Andrew Lack, has named RT one of the agency’s main challenges alongside extremist groups like the Islamic State and Boko Haram. Lack, the first chief executive of the BBG, mentioned RT in an interview with The New York Times.
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Majority of U.S. Public School Students are in Poverty

For the first time in at least 50 years, a majority of U.S. public school students come from low-income families, according to a new analysis of 2013 federal data, a statistic that has profound implications for the nation. The Southern Education Foundation reports that 51 percent of students in pre-kindergarten through 12th grade in the 2012-2013 school year were eligible for the federal program that provides free and reduced-price lunches. The lunch program is a rough proxy for poverty, but the explosion in the number of needy children in the nation’s public classrooms is a recent phenomenon that has been gaining attention among educators, public officials and researchers.
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Mystery goo kills over 200 San Francisco Bay birds, officials stumped

California officials are unable to identify a grey, goo-like substance that has been found coating the feathers of hundreds of birds. More than 200 seabirds have been found dead along the coast, while more than 300 have been rescued so far. The strange, gooey substance degrades the water-repellent properties in the birds’ feathers, causing hypothermia from extended stays in the water.
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The US Military Is Building Gangs of Autonomous Flying War Bots

For the Pentagon, drones are cheaper to buy and to operate than regular fighter jets. An armed MQ-9 Reaper drone runs about $14 million, compared to $180 million or more for an F-35 Joint Strike Fighter. But unlike barrel-rolling a jet, the business of actually operating a unmanned aerial vehicle, UAV, for the military is lonely, thankless, and incredibly difficult. It’s no wonder the Pentagon doesn’t have enough drone pilots to meet its needs, a problem certain to persist as the military increases its reliance on unmanned systems, especially in areas where it has no interest in putting boots on the ground, like Pakistan or Iraq. The solution that the military is exploring: increasing the level of autonomy in UAVs to allow one pilot to manage several drones at once.
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The UK kidnapped people for the Libyan government and secretly shipped them to Tripoli for Gadhaffi to torture

Tony Blair wrote to Colonel Muammar Gaddafi to thank him for the “excellent cooperation” between the two countries’ counter-terrorism agencies following a period during which the UK and Libya worked together to arrange for Libyan dissidents to be kidnapped and flown to Tripoli, along with their families. The letter, written in 2007, followed a period in which the dictator’s intelligence officers were permitted to operate in the UK, approaching and intimidating Libyan refugees in an attempt to persuade them to work as informants for both countries’ agencies.
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Remembering The Currency Wars Of The 1920s & 1930s (And Central Banks' "Overused Bag Of Tricks")

Commodity price declines were the symptom of sharply deteriorating economic conditions prior to the 1920-21 depression. To be sure, today’s economic environment is different. The world economies are not emerging from a destructive war, nor are we on the gold standard, and U.S. employment is no longer centered in agriculture and factories (over 50% in the U.S. in 1920). The fact remains, however, that global commodity prices are in noticeable retreat. Since the commodity index peak in 2011, prices have plummeted. The Reuters/Jefferies/CRB Future Price Index has dropped 39%. The GSCI Nearby Commodity Index is down 48% (Chart 1), with energy (-56%), metals (-36%), copper (-40%), cotton (-73%), WTI crude (-57%), rubber (-72%), and the list goes on. In some cases this broad-based retreat reflects increased supply, but more clearly it indicates weakening global demand.
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Kelly Thomas: Cops Brutally Murder Homeless Man on Video, Found Not Guilty

Unbelievably — but not surprisingly — the officers have been found “not guilty,” according to reports. A jury has found them not guilty on all charges, despite the overwhelming video evidence. A third officer, Joseph Wolfe, was also accused of involuntary manslaughter, but the DA has now dropped the charges in light of the not guilty verdict.
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How the CIA made Google: Inside the secret network behind mass surveillance, endless war, and Skynet

Google was merely the first among a plethora of private sector start-ups co-opted by US intelligence to retain ‘information superiority.’ The origins of this ingenious strategy trace back to a secret Pentagon-sponsored group, that for the last two decades has functioned as a bridge between the US government and elites across the business, industry, finance, corporate, and media sectors. The group has allowed some of the most powerful special interests in corporate America to systematically circumvent democratic accountability and the rule of law to influence government policies, as well as public opinion in the US and around the world. The results have been catastrophic: NSA mass surveillance, a permanent state of global war, and a new initiative to transform the US military into Skynet.
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A 600,000 Cubic Foot Blimp May Be Spying on You

In the summer of 1849, Austrian Field Marshall Joseph Radetzky did something no one had done before: He bombed a city from the air. His target was Venice, then in rebellion against the Habsburg crown. During the siege, he launched a fleet of unmanned linen balloons, carrying bombs made from canister shot and gunpowder, timed to drop over the besieged city. Radetzky told Emperor Franz Joseph that the effect on the people of Venice was “frightful.” Indeed, Radetzky’s balloons had done little physical damage, but had a substantial effect on the morale of the city’s defenders. As the 19th century wore on, fear of attack by airships became a constant theme in popular literature. By World War I, the mere mention of the word “Zeppelin” was enough to cause panic in the streets of London.
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How the CIA made Google

Google was merely the first among a plethora of private sector start-ups co-opted by US intelligence to retain ‘information superiority.’ The origins of this ingenious strategy trace back to a secret Pentagon-sponsored group, that for the last two decades has functioned as a bridge between the US government and elites across the business, industry, finance, corporate, and media sectors. The group has allowed some of the most powerful special interests in corporate America to systematically circumvent democratic accountability and the rule of law to influence government policies, as well as public opinion in the US and around the world. The results have been catastrophic: NSA mass surveillance, a permanent state of global war, and a new initiative to transform the US military into Skynet.
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BlackListed News 2006-2015