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Chinese Scientists Admitted to Tweaking Genes of Human Embryos for First Time

A recent biotech discovery — one that has been called the biggest biotech discovery of the century — showed how scientists might be able to modify a human genome when that genome was still just in an embryo. This could change not only the genetic material of a person, but could also change the DNA they pass on, removing “bad” genetic codes (and potentially adding “good” ones) and taking an active hand in evolution.
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Three Former CIA Officers Want to Help You Apply Interrogation Techniques to Everyday Life

As protests grow across Canada against Bill C-51, the bill’s supporters might do well to read Get the Truth. It maintains the best way to elicit confessions is by displaying empathy with subjects, and to keep them in “short-term thinking” mode, where the consequences of revealing deception seem to dissipate. The authors acknowledge the torture overseen by their former agency, as revealed in books such as Ali H. Soufan’s Black Banners—which they take up directly—and in Guantànamo Diary, published in January by Mohamedou Ould Slahi, who remains in detention after 12 years at the US base, presumed guilty without ever having been charged with a crime.
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Puerto Rico officials warn government shutdown imminent

In a letter to leading lawmakers, including Governor Alejandro Padilla, the officials said a financing deal that could potentially salvage the government’s finances currently looked unlikely to succeed. It warned of laying off government employees and reducing public services.
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Head Transplant Doctor: Creating Immortality Is the Goal

The Italian doctor who has claimed that he could transplant a man’s head onto a donor’s body has said that he could do much of the procedure in less than an hour. The procedure — which Canavero has admitted is just a first step towards his ultimate aim of creating immortality — will see a man’s head removed and placed on a donor’s body.
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Radioactive Drone That Landed on Japan PM's Rooftop Also Carried Cesium in Liquid Container, Investigators Say

A drone carrying a small amount of radioactive cesium that was found on the roof of the prime minister’s office may have landed there in the last few days, investigative sources said Thursday, as authorities moved to beef up security and weighed regulating drone flights. When Prime Minister Shinzo Abe used the helipad on the roof on March 22 to fly to Kanagawa Prefecture for a graduation ceremony at the National Defense Academy, the four-propeller drone was not there and no staff members had visited the roof since then, the sources said.
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Fukushima nuke plant owner told to upgrade from Windows XP on 48,000 PCs at TEPCO

The Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO), operator of the stricken Fukushima Daiichi nuclear energy complex, has been told to migrate 48,000 internet-connected PCs off Windows XP sooner rather than later. TEPCO was recently probed by Japan's Board of Audit, an organisation that oversees the finances of Japan's government and government agencies. The Board of Audit is interested in TEPCO because Japan is keen to see the company pay for cleanup of the Fukushima mess.
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And Now… “How Tor Is Building a New Dark Net with Help from the U.S. Military”

The funding, which began in 2014, comes as part of DARPA’s Memex project, a “groundbreaking” search engine designed to best commercial titans like Google at searching the Deep Web and other oft-ignored terrain for the U.S. intelligence, law enforcement, and military. To build Memex, DARPA is partnered with universities like Carnegie Mellon, NASA, private research firms, and several Tor Project developers.
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Corporate Sovereignty Trumps National Laws; Here's How The US Thinks It Can Get Around That

For a while now, Techdirt has been writing about the extraordinary corporate sovereignty chapters in trade agreements that grant foreign companies far-reaching powers to sue a government simply for issuing regulations that impact their investments. Recently, there has been a textbook example of how the investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS) tribunals that adjudicate corporate sovereignty cases are literally a law unto themselves.
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House Passes Cybersecurity Bill Despite Privacy Protests

Congress is hellbent on passing a cybersecurity bill that can stop the wave of hacker breaches hitting American corporations. And they’re not letting the protests of a few dozen privacy and civil liberties organizations get in their way. On Wednesday the House of Representatives voted 307-116 to pass the Protecting Cyber Networks Act, a bill designed to allow more fluid sharing of cybersecurity threat data between corporations and government agencies. That new system for sharing information is designed to act as a real-time immune system against hacker attacks, allowing companies to warn one another via government intermediaries about the tools and techniques of advanced hackers. But privacy critics say it also threatens to open up a new backchannel for surveillance of American citizens, in some cases granting the same companies legal immunity to share their users’ private data with government agencies that include the NSA.
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GM Says That While You May Own Your Car, It Owns The Software In It, Thanks To Copyright

Last week, we noted that Senator Ron Wyden and Rep. Jared Polis had introduced an important bill to fix a part of the DMCA's broken anti-circumvention laws found in Section 1201 of the DMCA. For whatever reason, some people still have trouble understanding why the law is so broken. So here's a story that hopefully makes the point clearly. Thanks to DMCA 1201, John Deere claims it still owns the tractor you thought you bought from it. Instead, John Deere claims you're really just licensing that tractor
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Oklahoma City Bombing Breakthrough

Two decades have passed since the April 19, 1995, Oklahoma City bombing. It was the deadliest act of domestic terrorism in American history, and 168 people died, including 19 children. The attack on the Murrah Federal Building was said to be the work of Timothy McVeigh and two confederates, described as right-wing extremists with an anti-government agenda. McVeigh was executed by lethal injection and Terry Nichols and Michael Fortier were given prison sentences.
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Cop Smash & Grab: Houston Police Caught on Video Kicking in Door to Business, Stealing Cash

Two Houston Police officers were caught on camera kicking down the door of local business owner Marcquette Jones last Wednesday. Jones, the 36-year-old owner of The South Side Game Room, says this isn’t the first time the officers unlawfully entered his business. According to the business owner, the two cops paid him the first visit on January 20, claiming they were there to “check building code compliance.”
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It Just Cost Deutsche Bank $25,000 Per Employee To Keep Its Libor Manipulating Bankers Out Of Jail

And so another historic scandal involving the manipulation and rigging of one of the most important global markets, that of Libor which is the reference security for several hundred trillion in derivatives, goes in the history books. Moments ago the NY Department for Financial Services announced that Deutsche Bank would pay $2.5 billion "in connection with the manipulation of the benchmark interest rates, including the London Interbank Offered Bank ("LIBOR"), the Euro Interbank Offered Rate ("EURIBOR") and Euroyen Tokyo Interbank Offered Rate ("TIBOR") (collectively, "IBOR")."
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Bad Guys Pushing THIS WEEK to Promote Global Tyranny Run By Corporations

The powers-that-be are pushing this week to fast track a horrible treaty which would destroy America. The treaty is called the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP). The U.S. Trade Representative – the federal agency responsible for negotiating trade treaties – has said that the details of the TPP are classified due to “national security”.
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Caught On Tape: Cop Grabs, Smashes Phone Of Woman Recording Him

"He told me that I had to go. He said I was interfering with their investigation and I told [him] that I was on a public sidewalk and I had the right to film them.." And then this happened...
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Legislation that Fines Cops $15,000 for Interfering with Citizens who Film Them, Passes House

A recently proposed bill in Colorado imposing legal penalties on police officers who interfere with citizens filming them could soon become law. The state’s House Of Representatives passed the bill this week, and it will now move on to vote in the Senate. If it becomes law, the bill would reportedly require police officers to have someone’s consent or a warrant to physically take or destroy a persons camera or footage. If an officer violates this law, the victim would then be able to seek damages up to $15,000 plus attorney fees. This would also be the first law in the country that would guarantee civil damages to people who have their recording rights violated by police.
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Foxconn Middle School: Chinese school likened to 'cell block' after pupils jump to their deaths

A middle school in northern China has been likened to prison block after bars were installed on windows and balconies to deter pupils from jumping to their deaths, according to a newspaper report. The security measures have been taken at Hengshui No. 2 Middle School in Hebei province and were prompted after two pupils killed themselves jumping, apparently due to the pressure they felt to succeed academically, the Beijing Times reported. One died in October last year and the other last month, the report said.
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The School Of The Americas Is Still Exporting Death Squads

In 2009, just a year before Sebastián Piñera became president of Chile, Michelle Bachelet approved the training of 211 Chilean recruits at the Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation (WHINSEC), formerly known as the School of the Americas (SOA). Between 1999 and 2010, Chilean governments sent a total of 1,205 recruits to the school, with Bachelet remaining at the helm of cooperation with the U.S.-based institute that has graduated scores of alumni involved in human rights violations under Chile’s dictatorship era from 1973 to 1990.
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European Rights Body Again Rejects Mass Surveillance

“Mass surveillance does not appear to have contributed to the prevention of terrorist attacks, contrary to earlier assertions made by senior intelligence officials. Instead, resources that might prevent attacks are diverted to mass surveillance, leaving potentially dangerous persons free to act,” PACE warned yesterday.
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Wireless routers could spy on your breathing and heartbeat

A radar-like system that fits inside a Wi-Fi box can record health data and keep tabs on your mood – without you even noticing IT HAPPENS the moment you walk in: without you being aware of it, an undercover system discreetly records your breathing and heartbeat. Welcome to the Katabi Lab, part of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
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