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DARPA Thinks Insect Brains Might Hold the Secret to Next-Gen AI

Published: January 12, 2019
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Source: Defense One

<i> by <a href='https://pxhere.com/en/photo/625536'>Pxhere</a> on </i>

 

They’re small, efficient and capable of basic reasoning, and researchers want artificial intelligence tools to do the same.

The Pentagon’s research wing is trying to reduce the amount of computing power and hardware needed to run advanced artificial intelligence tools, and it’s turning to insects for inspiration.

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency on Friday began soliciting ideas on how to build computing systems as small and efficient as the brains of “very small flying insects.” The Microscale Biomimetic Robust Artificial Intelligence Networks program, or MicroBRAIN, could ultimately result in artificial intelligence systems that can be trained on less data and operated with less energy, according to the agency.

Analyzing insects’ brains, which allow them to navigate the world with minimal information, could also help researchers understand how to build AI systems capable of basic common sense reasoning.

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