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121 Dead: July Was the Deadliest Month in Recent History for Police Killings

Over the years, it has been difficult to tell exactly how many people have been killed by police. So many cases are swept under the rug and totally ignored because the suspect was “guilty” of some small nonviolent offense, or because they ran from the police. Luckily, in recent years as the alternative media has begun to expose police killings, independent organizations are beginning to keep a tally of every killing they possibly can. This tallying is done to give the public a more accurate figure, and show them how much of a problem this actually is.
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US Arms Sales to Saudi Arabia Contributing to Conflict in Yemen

nited States’ weapons and logistical support for Saudi Arabia’s military campaign in Yemen signals that Washington is backing Riyadh’s goal to crush Houthi rebels despite UN calls for a political solution, experts told Sputnik on Friday. The United States is providing intelligence and refueling support to enable a four-month-old Saudi-led air campaign against Houthi rebels and allied forces.
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MtGox Bitcoin Chief Mark Karpeles Arrested in Japan

Japanese police have arrested the CEO of the collapsed company MtGox, which was once the world's biggest exchange of the virtual currency, bitcoin, reports the BBC. Mark Karpeles, 30, is being held in connection with the loss of bitcoins worth $387m (£247m, €351m) last February.
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Al-Qaeda Attacks CIA-Trained Syrian "Freedom Fighters"; Commander Captured

Attempts to make sense of the prolonged, bloody conflict in Syria which threatens Turkey’s southern border and long ago spilled over into Iraq, are everywhere and always complicated by the constantly shifting alliances among the various groups fighting for control of the country. For instance, commentators were taken off guard in April when al-Qaeda affiliate al-Nusra appeared to be working in tandem with rival ISIS in a push to control the Yarmouk refugee camp in Damascus. The siege - which transformed the camp into what Ban Ki-Moon called "the worst circle of hell" - also saw Palestinian militiamen forge awkward alliances with the Assad regime in the face of the militant assault.
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Bin Laden relatives reportedly killed in private jet crash

“There were no survivors, unfortunately. There were four people onboard including the pilot”, a spokeswoman for the British police said. The Saudi Ambassador to Britain, Prince Mohammed bin Nawaf Al Saud, offered condolences on the embassy’s official Twitter account to the bin Laden family, a prominent Saudi Arabia clan with vast business interests.
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US Cops Kill More People in a Day than Norwegian Cops Have in a Decade

With Americans being killed by police every day, one begins to wonder what the country would be like if cops were trained differently and stopped resorting to lethal force so quickly. One country we can look to is Norway. In Norway, cops have shot only one person to death. That was nearly a decade ago.
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Hold the phone, Central! Cellphone radiation can cause cancer: study

The scientists were right — your cell phone can give you cancer. There have long been whispers of a cancer connection from your cell — and a new study backs up the claims.
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Apple Watch demand not enough for suppliers to break even

Apple told investors earlier this month that sales of the Apple Watch have far exceeded its own internal expectations, but some of the companies that are making parts for the new wearable are claiming that they can’t even break even because demand is so weak. Taiwan’s Advanced Semiconductor Engineering (ASE) which makes the system-in-package case that contains Apple Watch’s array of sensors and chips, told investors during a conference call that it still hasn’t reached “break even volume” of two million units per month.
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TSA’s Behavior Detection Program Has a Newsletter, and It’s Ridiculous

The Transportation Security Administration’s embattled behavior detection program has not identified a single terrorist, but it has produced glossy bimonthly newsletters poking fun at the traveling public. In these employee newsletters — six of which were obtained by The Intercept — behavior detection officers, who are supposed to help spot possible terrorists, sometimes make fun of inexperienced or nervous travelers, including one “sweet little old lady” who thought the bowl for metallic objects was a tip jar.
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Consumers Finally “Getting on with Their Lives” as Credit-Card Debt Slaves: Equifax

Consumers Finally “Getting on with Their Lives” as Credit-Card Debt Slaves: Equifax Equifax, which profits from the process when more people apply for credit and load up on debt, sees the miracles of the current economy this way: “American consumers continue to show signs they are recovering from the Great Recession by steadily increasing their credit card debt….”
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This $1,000 Device Lets Hackers Hijack Satellite Communications

A satellite tracking technology can be easily hacked with the help of a $1,000 device made of off the shelf components, according to a security researcher who found a flaw in the technology. Taking advantage of this flaw, criminal hackers could track and hijack valuable cargo, such as military supplies or cash and gold stored in an armored car, according to Colby Moore, a researcher at security firm Synack, who plans to show off his findings at the upcoming Black Hat security conference.
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Total Collapse: Greece Reverts To Barter Economy For First Time Since Nazi Occupation

Subsequently, the Greek economy began to deteriorate in the face of increasingly fraught negotiations between Athens and creditors, with Brussels blaming the economic slide on Syriza’s unwillingness to implement reforms, while analysts and commentators noted that relentless deposit flight and the weakened state of the Greek banking sector was contributing to a liquidity crisis and severe credit contraction.
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Russia Shoots Down US Stealth Coup

That is because the United States can no longer hide the fact that it is behind these protests and often, even hide their role in the armed elements that are brought in covertly to give targeted governments their final push out the door. Nations have learned to identify, expose, and resist this tactic, and like Adolf Hitler and the Nazi regime’s tactic of Blitzkrieg or “lighting war,” once appropriate countermeasures are found, the effectiveness of lighting fast, overwhelming force be it military or political, is rendered impotent. This was most recently observed in Armenia during the so-called “Electric Yerevan” protests – Yerevan being the capital of Armenia, and “electric” in reference to the alleged motivation of protesters – rising electric prices.
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Contrary To What You’ve Heard, TPP Will Undermine US Law — Including Supreme Court Decisions

The specific issue is that, under the 11th Amendment to the Constitution, state governments are given “sovereign immunity” from most legal issues in federal court. And, when it comes to things like patents, the Supreme Court decided that Congress could not pass a law that takes away such sovereign immunity from the states. In practice, this means state governments — including things like research universities — are able to infringe on patents in the public interest, claiming sovereign immunity in state courts against such claims. We’ve pointed out in the past how hypocritical it is that state universities frequently use such sovereign immunity claims to avoid lawsuits, while at the same time being some of the most aggressive patent trolls in going after others (with the University of California being a prime example). However, it is the law of the land and in the Constitution that sovereign immunity on things like patents cannot be abridged.
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It’s Back: FEC Says Regulating Internet, Google, Facebook Under Its ‘purview’

Ann M. Ravel, discussing election regulation during a speech in New York, suggested it was time to produce “thoughtful policy” targeting internet political activity. She also expressed frustration that her last bid was met with “threatening misogynist responses to me.” She was speaking at a day-long conference hosted by the Brennan Center for Justice, the New York City Campaign Finance Board, and the Committee for Economic Development when she was asked about regulating the internet, Google and Facebook.
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Revolving Door on Steroids – New Bank of England Policymaker Allowed to Retain Financial Interest in Hedge Fund

Can’t a guy enjoy a beautiful Friday in Colorado without being bombarded with another gigantic oligarch scam? I guess not. Today’s article takes the revolving door theme to a whole other level. It even puts the recent revelation that law firm Covington and Burlington kept an office empty for Eric Holder while he was head of the Department of Justice to shame. You can’t make this stuff up.
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Britain’s secret ties to governments, firms, behind ISIS oil sales

In the scramble to access Kurdistan’s oil and gas wealth, the US and UK are turning a blind eye to complicity in ‘Islamic State’ oil smuggling. Key allies in the US and UK led war on Islamic State (ISIS) are covertly financing the terrorist movement according to senior political sources in the region. US and British oil companies are heavily invested in the murky geopolitical triangle sustaining ISIS’ black market oil sales.
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History is Repeating – German Government Launches Investigation of Journalists for Treason

If it were up to the Federal Attorney General and the President of the German Domestic Security Agency, two of our reporters would soon be in prison for at least two years. Today, we were officially informed about investigations against our Markus Beckedahl, Andre Meister and an unknown“ party. The accusation: Treason. – From Netzpolitik.org: Suspicion of Treason“: Federal Attorney General Announces Investigation Against Us In Addition To Our Sources Widespread outrage across Germany is erupting following the revelation that the nation’s Attorney General has launched an investigation into treason charges for two journalists working for Netzpolitik.
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Feds: 664,607 illegals granted amnesty, some linked to terrorism, gangs

The administration’s program to grant amnesty to illegal immigrants under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival program has given the green light to 664,607 since 2012, including several linked to fraud, terrorism and gangs, according to the U.S Citizenship and Immigration Services agency.
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Google brings deep neural networks to your phone with Translate

Google’s neural networks are good for more than just making trippy art. If you download and run the company’s latest translation app, you will be using a deep neural network — and not just through the cloud, but right on your own phone. The network instantly adds twenty additional languages to the existing seven that their app could decode before, but that’s just the beginning.
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